Photojournalism

Ever heard of this word – Photojournalism?

 

Don’t be shocked if you don’t know about it, as I too came to know about it recently.

 

As the name suggests, it is journalism through photography. In a broader sense, it is a kind of photography, which creates images in order to tell a news story.

 

Interesting? Now read on.

 

The practice of illustrating news stories with photographs was made possible by printing and photography innovations that occurred between 1880 and 1897. While newsworthy events were photographed as early as the 1850s, printing presses could only publish from engravings until the 1880s. Early news photographs required that photos be re-interpreted by an engraver before they could be published. The first photojournalist was Carol Szathmari who did pictures in the Crimean War(1853 to 1856).

 

The “golden age” of photojournalism was in 1930s1950s where several photographers and magazine/newspapers built huge reputation with this concept.

Since the late 1970s, photojournalism and documentary photography have increasingly been accorded a place in art galleries alongside fine art photography.

What is the difference between a photographer, journalist and a photojournalist:

A journalist tells stories.

A photographer takes pictures of nouns (people, places and things). A photojournalist takes the best of both and locks it into the most powerful medium available – frozen images. Photographers take pictures of people, places and things etc.

Photojournalists shoot action verbs such as “kicks”, “explodes”, “cries”, “firing of a bullet” etc.

There are a few rules for the photojournalism as well:

Here are a few rules of thumb:  (i) the image should present an instantly recognizable story; (ii) it should be of interest to the average viewer; (iii) it must show good technique (focus, exposure, etc.); and (iv) composition should be appropriate for the subject matter.

 

Photojournalist is considered as one of the exciting career options but due to its demand for travelling and high risk taking, there are a less number of people involved in this kind of journalism.

Photojournalism can be extremely hard work, and the person who chooses it as career should be dedicated.

But with the new technology in digital photography, many are pursuing this as a career as well.

Also, check out this superb blog on Photojournalism by Mark Hancock http://markhancock.blogspot.com/1996/01/what-is-photojournalist.html

About Su
IT consultant by profession, writer/blogger by passion. I love photography. I write about general affairs in day to day life spanning across inspirational thoughts/quotes, women/child/animal rights, photography, DIYs, book reviews to name a few. Follow me - Twitter: @sunayana18 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sunayana18 Polka Cafe (freelance writer): http://www.polkacafe.com/sunayana MyTrendingStories(freelance/contributor): https://mytrendingstories.com/profile/su-srikanth/

5 Comments

  1. Here is another source that offers a wealth of information on Photojournalism
    http:pressphotojournal.wordpress.com

    Stop by and take a look

    Reply
  2. Hi there,
    Thanks for the info, i shall take a look…
    Thanks for coming by my blog..
    Keep reading..

    Cheers,
    Su

    Reply
  3. I’d have to disagree somewhat with your interpretation Su…if as you state, “The practice of illustrating news stories with photographs was made possible by printing and photography innovations that occurred between 1880 and 1897” Carol Szathmari could hardly have been a “photojournalist” during the Crimean War as there was no way for his (her?) pictures to be reproduced in the journals of the day.

    Reply
  4. robertwalls :I’d have to disagree somewhat with your interpretation Su…if as you state, “The practice of illustrating news stories with photographs was made possible by printing and photography innovations that occurred between 1880 and 1897″ Carol Szathmari could hardly have been a “photojournalist” during the Crimean War as there was no way for his (her?) pictures to be reproduced in the journals of the day.

    Hi Rob,
    Many thanks for coming by my blog.. 🙂
    Photojournalism, as i could interpret and understand, is a medium where a story is told using photographs. Recording the news is the goal of the photojournalist but not make news…
    About Carol Szathmari(i got this info from a webpage): Rumanian painter, lithographer and photographer present at the Crimean War (1854-1856)..
    Photojournalism was first started by this guy, he was at war and the images of he battle ground depicting the war-front… supposedly, only a few photos by this guy has survived. i tried on the internet to know what his photos are like, but other than depicting what he had done, i couldnt get a hold onto it.
    Cheers, keep mailing,
    Su

    Reply
  5. Hi Su,

    Despite what the websites say about Carol Szathmari, he is a photographer, not a photojournalist. The very name photojournalist carries with it the requirement of publication of his photographs in a “journal”. In that it was impossible for him to follow through to the logical step of journalism with his work, he could not, by any stretch of the imagination be described as a “photojournalist”.

    He can be called a war photographer; I’ve seen him described as a “combat photographer”, but it is highly doubtful that he photographed combat, at best battlefields or troops at rest (as did his fellow Crimean War photographer, Roger Fenton. A better description might be a “documentary photographer”.

    http://robertwalls.wordpress.com

    Reply

Heyya! Lemme know what you think :)

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